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Guyanese With Links To Drug Dealer Roger Khan Helps In Decades Old Murder Case

David (Plot) Gill was among two others convicted by a federal jury Thursday in the drug-related murder of Michael Dawson, 23, on June 22, 1994. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Attorney's office)

David (Plot) Gill was among two others convicted by a federal jury in the drug-related murder of Michael Dawson, 23, on June 22, 1994 thanks to Paul Ford. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Attorney’s office)

By NAN Staff Writer

News Americas, BROOKLYN, N.Y., Mon. Nov. 17, 2014: A self-confessed Guyanese drug dealer with ties to Guyana “Phantom death squad” founder and drug lord, Shaheed ‘Roger’ Khan, has helped federal prosecutors convict three murderers in a two decades old crime.

Paul (Uncles) Ford, a drug supplier and admitted murderer from Guyana, told jurors in the trial of Brian ‘Brawl’ Gill, 46; David ‘Plot’ Gill, 43; and Samuel ‘Waco’ McIntosh, 40; that he saw the three kill Michael Dawson on June 22, 1994 in the Park Hill housing complex in the Clifton neighborhood of Staten Island, NY.

Ford testified to calmly watching Dawson’s killing as he sat in a taxi, because he was interested in seeing how the violent scene, and the brothers’ dispute with Dawson, would play out.

Ford told jurors that as he watched from a taxi, he saw all three brothers shoot and kill Dawson. Brian Gill used a machine gun, David Gill used a 9mm handgun, and McIntosh used a .38-caliber revolver, according to federal prosecutors.

After a three week trial, a federal jury in Brooklyn late last week returned guilty verdicts against the Gill brothers and McIntosh.

Ford came to the United States on a soccer scholarship and within a year he was making hundreds of thousands of dollars selling cocaine up and down the East [Coast], the defense told the court.

In the ’90s he began trafficking in drugs with Khan’s Phantom death squad.

The squad, run by Khan, is believed to be responsible for hundreds of killings in Guyana in the early to mid-2000s.

Brian Gill faces a mandatory minimum sentence of life imprisonment while David Gill and Samuel McIntosh each face a mandatory minimum sentence of 20 years’ imprisonment and a maximum sentence of life imprisonment.

Ford, meanwhile, had also testified last month at the drugs-and-murder racketeering trial of brothers Anthony and Harvey Christian, who were accused of running the crack trade in the Park Hill complex for 20 years. Both were found guilty on Oct. 27, along with accomplice Jason Quinn.